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Fabrizio de Luca

Fabrizio de Luca

Italian freelance VMware Certified Instructor (VCI) and VMware Certified Mentor (VCM) based in Milano, teaching official VMware courses for the major VMware Authorized Training Centers (VATC) in EMEA. Website URL:

VSICM55 - Slide 07-40 - Verifying vSphere vMotion Layout: Virtual Machine Map



Wrong:

Second paragraph in the slide notes states:

sc-goose01 and sc- goose02 hosts have access to the SharedVMs datastore, where the files of AppSvr02 reside. But only sc-goose02 has access to the port group named Production.
Correct:

Actually, the slide graphic shows a different situation. Whilst both hosts are accessing the port group named Production, only sc-goose02 can access the datastore named nfs_library, which is used by the virtual machine. Hence, the above sentence should be reworded as follows:

sc-goose01 and sc- goose02 hosts have access to the SharedVMs datastore, where the files of AppSvr02 reside. But only sc-goose02 has access to the datastore named nfs_library.

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VSICM55 - Slide 06-11 - NFS



Room for improvement:

Slide graphic states:

Supports NFS version 3 over TCP/IP.
Correct:

As a fellow VMware and NetApp Certified Instructor has noted, the slide graphic should be better stating:

Supports NFS version 3 over TCP.

This as opposed to default NFS transport, which is UPD. Starting with NFS version 3 it is possible to choose between UDP and TCP.

Source:

RFC 1813: NFS Version 3 Protocol Specification - Paragraph 2.3 "Transport address".

Credits:

Francesco Giuliano.


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VMware releases a new "Certified Professional 5 - Data Center Virtualization" (VCP5-DCV) certification exam (VCP550)

Today, January 22, VMware released a new exam to qualify candidates for the VMware Certified Professional 5 - Data Center Virtualization (VCP5-DCV) certification. This exam - called VCP550 - is based on the recently released vSphere 5.5 platform and will temporarily coexist with the previous exam edition - named VCP510 - a version-agnostic test based on both vSphere 5.0 and vSphere 5.1.

Successfully passing either of the above exams, together with the required completion of any of the eligible official VMware courses, will make you earn the VCP5-DCV certification. Hence, if you already own the VCP5-DCV certification, there's no need to take VCP550 exam.

 

Besides newly incorporated content from the vSphere 5.5 platform, some other changes have been introduced:

  • Exam VCP550 is now made of 135 questions (50 more than before) - this way aligning with other VCP certification exams like VCP-Cloud and VCP5-DT - plus the usual short pre-exam survey consisting of 8 questions.
  • Allotted time has also been increased to 120 minutes (so 30 minutes more than previous exam) with an additional 15 minutes to complete the survey questions and agreements.

As usual, candidates taking the exam in a country where English is not the primary language will be automatically granted an extra 30 minutes to the exam time.

 

Further details about the certification exams, links to download the Exam Blueprints and request exam authorization can be found in a VMware Certification blog post, together with the list of the approved VMware official courses entitling you to take the certification exam.

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VSICM55 - Slide 07-32 - Comparison of Migration Types



Room for improvement:

Slide graphic shows a table listing the various virtual machine migration types, the last one - Enhanced vMotion - has been renamed in vSphere 5.5.

1. Correct:

The vMotion migration without shared storage, introduced in vSphere 5.1, was originally named Enhanced vMotion. As with vSphere 5.5, VMware has decided to rename the feature as Cross-Host vMotion Migration in the course slides and vMotion Without Shared Storage in the VMware vSphere 5.5 Documentation Center. Whichever name you want to refer to, Enhanced vMotion should not be used anymore.

1. Source:

VMware vSphere 5.5 Documentation Center.


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VSICM55 - Slide 07-31 - Migrating Virtual Machines



1. Wrong:

When describing the various virtual machine migration types, the name of the last one is completely wrong. Slide notes state:

Enhanced vMotion Compatibility (EVC): Migrate a powered-on virtual machine to a new datastore and a new host.
1. Correct:

Enhanced vMotion Compatibility (EVC) is something completely different. EVC is a cluster feature that prevents vSphere vMotion migrations from failing because of incompatible CPUs.

The vMotion migration without shared storage, introduced in vSphere 5.1, was originally named Enhanced vMotion. Hence, due to the similarity between the two names, the confusion above took place.

As with vSphere 5.5, VMware has decided to rename the feature as Cross-Host vMotion Migration in the course slides and vMotion Without Shared Storage in the VMware vSphere 5.5 Documentation Center. Whichever name you want to refer to, it cannot anyway be EVC.

1. Source:

VMware vSphere 5.5 Documentation Center.



2. Wrong:

In the slide graphic, last bullet states:

A maximum of eight simultaneous vMotion, cloning, deployment, or Storage vMotion accesses to a single VMware vSphere® VMFS-5 datastore is supported.
2. Correct:

Starting with vSphere 4.1, the maximum number of simultaneous vMotion operations per datastore has been increased to 128. Additionally there is no difference, in terms of maximum concurrent operations, between a VMFS-3, a VMFS-5 or an NFS datastore. Other limits listed in the slide - cloning, deployment and Storage vMotion - are still valid as of vSphere 5.5.

2. Info:

More details about why the above limits apply to datastores and hosts can be found in the "vCenter Server and Host Management" guide, "Migrating Virtual Machines in the vSphere Web Client" chapter - "Limits on Simultaneous Migrations in the vSphere Web Client" paragraph, available in the vSphere 5.5 Documentation Center.

2. Source:

Configuration Maximums for VMware vSphere 4.1.

Configuration Maximums for VMware vSphere 5.0.

Configuration Maximums for VMware vSphere 5.1.

Configuration Maximums for VMware vSphere 5.5.



3. Wrong:

At the end of the slide notes you can read that:

With file relocation, the contents of the raw LUN mapped by the RDM are copied into a new .vmdk file at the destination. The copy operation is effectively converting a raw LUN into a virtual disk.
If you must cold-migrate a virtual machine without cloning or converting its RDMs, remove them from the configuration of the virtual machine before migrating and recreate them when migration has completed.
3. Correct:

The above statements are either incomplete or incorrect. The described Storage vMotion behavior was a limitation when migrating RDMs in vSphere 4.x, yet in vSphere 5.x it has been improved.
Cormac Hogan - a Senior Storage Architect in the Integration Engineering team which is part of VMware R&D - has further clarified RDM behavior during Storage vMotion operations.

  • VM with Physical (Pass-Thru) RDMs (Powered On – Storage vMotion):
    • If I try to change the format to thin or thick, then no Storage vMotion allowed.
    • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the pRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN.
  • VM with Virtual (non Pass-Thru) RDMs (Power On – Storage vMotion):
    • On a migrate, if I chose to covert the format in the advanced view, the vRDM is converted to a VMDK on the destination VMFS datastore.
    • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the vRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN (same behavior as pRDM).
  • VM with Physical (Pass-Thru) RDMs (Powered Off – Cold Migration):
    • On a migrate, if I chose to change the format (via the advanced view), the pRDM is converted to a VMDK on the destination VMFS datastore.
    • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the pRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN.
  • VM with Virtual (non Pass-Thru) RDMs (Power Off – Cold Migration):
    • On a migrate, if I chose to covert the format in the advanced view, the vRDM is converted to a VMDK on the destination VMFS datastore.
    • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the vRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN (same behaviour as pRDM).
3. Source:

VMware vSphere Blog.


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(Re)installing the vSphere Web Client 5.5 Integration Plug-in

The Client Integration Plug-in provides access to a virtual machine's console in the vSphere Web Client. It also support some other vSphere infrastructure features such as deploying OVF or OVA templates and transferring files with the datastore browser. You can also use the Client Integration Plug-in to connect virtual devices that reside on a client computer to a virtual machine.

Normally, in order to enable the functionalities listed above, the Client Integration Plug-in is something you need to install only once. Newer vSphere releases generally offer an upgrade option for the Client Integration Plug-in.

If the Client Integration Plug-in is either missing or outdated, the vSphere Web Client GUI provides you with the opportunity to install the latest release. Once the plug-in has been installed or updated, all links pointing to the installation source are removed.

There are four ways you can install the Client Integration Plug-in:

Option

   

   Description

vSphere
Web Client
login page

   
  1. Open a Web browser and type the URL for the vSphere Web Client.
  2. At the bottom of the vSphere Web Client login page, click Download Client Integration Plug-in.
   

Guest OS
Details
panel

   

   This option is not available for browsers that run on a Mac OS.

  1. Select a virtual machine in the inventory and click the Summary tab.
  2. Click Download Plug-in.
   

OVF
deployment
wizard

   
  1. Select a host in the inventory and select Actions > All vCenter Actions > Deploy OVF Template.
  2. Click Download Client Integration Plug-in.
   

Virtual
machine
console

   

   This option is not available for Microsoft Internet Explorer, and for browsers that run on a Mac OS.

  1. Select a virtual machine in the inventory, click the Summary tab, and click Launch Console.
  2. At the top right corner of the virtual machine console window, click Download Client Integration Plugin.
Source: vSphere 5.5 Documentation Center.

 

Now suppose the following:

  1. What if you are convinced that your Client Integration Plug-in isn't working as expected and you want to quickly, manually reinstall it without having to uninstall it first?
  2. Also, what if you want to quickly reinstall the plug-in, but are remotely connected to your vCenter Server over a very slow connection?
  3. And again, what if you want to pre-distribute the plug-in, together with your preferred certified browser, to dozens, hundreds or thousands of client machines?

In short: how can you get hold of the Client Integration Plug-in installation packages for Windows, Mac OS X and/or Linux so that you can install them whenever you want?

 

The answer is simple: you can download the installation packages directly from the installation source in your vCenter Server 5.5.

  • If you are running a Windows-based vCenter Server, then the installation source is located in C:\Program Files\VMware\Infrastructure\vSphereWebClient\server\work\deployer\s\global\72\0\container-app-war-5.5.0.war\vmrc\
  • If you are running a vCenter Server Appliance, the installation source can be found in /usr/lib/vmware-vsphere-client/server/work/deployer/s/global/72/0/container-app-war-5.5.0.war/vmrc/

There you find the following packages:

  • VMware-ClientIntegrationPlugin-5.5.0.exe - for Windows clients
  • VMware-ClientIntegrationPlugin-5.5.0.i386.bundle - for 32bit Linux clients
  • VMware-ClientIntegrationPlugin-5.5.0.mac64.dmg - for Mac OS X clients
  • VMware-ClientIntegrationPlugin-5.5.0.x86_64.bundle - for 64bit Linux clients

 

For information about supported Internet browsers and guest operating system versions, see the VMware knowledgebase article number 2005083.

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VSICM55 - Slide 07-25 - Tools Options



Wrong:

Second sentence of the second paragraph in the slide notes states:

These scripts are set in the VMware Tools dialog box in the guest operating system.
Correct:

vSphere 5.0 has been the last release to include support for the VMware Tools graphical user interface, VMware Toolbox. VMware has continued to update and support the Toolbox command-line interface (CLI) to perform all VMware Tools functions.
Hence, there is no VMware Tools dialog box in the guest operating systems.

Info:

For information about using the Toolbox command-line interface on the various guest operating systems, see the "vSphere Virtual Machine Administration" guide - "VMware Tools Components, Configuration Options, and Security Requirements" chapter - "Using the VMware Tools Configuration Utility" paragraph and related subtopics in the VMware vSphere 5.5 Documentation Center.

Source:

VMware vSphere 5.0 Release Notes.


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VSICM55 - Slide 07-24 - Virtual Machine Options



1. Room for improvement:

The first sentence in the slide notes states:

The VM Options tab in the Virtual Machine Properties dialog box enables you to change a virtual machine’s options.
1. Correct:

Even if the wizard dialog box name mentioned above is conceptually tolerable, the actual name in the vSphere Web Client is instead Edit Settings, as it can be seen in the slide graphic.



2. Info:

Some vSphere 5.x releases of Storage vMotion do not rename virtual machine files following a successful migration. The virtual machine folder name changes, but the virtual machine file names don't.

This issue is resolved in:

  • VMware vCenter Server 5.0 Update 2
  • VMware vCenter Server 5.1 Update 1

2. Source:

VMware Knowledge Base articles.


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VSICM55 - Slide 07-21 - Creating an RDM



1. Wrong:

When describing physical compatibility mode RDMs (pRDM) limitations, slide notes state:

LUNs configured for pass-through mode can be a maximum of 62TB in size.
1. Correct:

The actual maximum size of a pRDM is 64TB.

The maximum size mentioned in slide notes - 62TB - is instead the new maximum configurable size in vSphere 5.5 for virtual compatibility mode RDMs (vRDM).

1. Source:

Configuration Maximums for VMware vSphere 5.5.



2. Room for improvement:

In the bulleted list on the slide notes, when referring to the compatibility modes supported by RDM, you can read that:

Physical compatibility (pass-through) mode [...] a LUN configured for physical compatibility cannot be cloned, made into a template, or migrated if the migration involves copying the disk.
Virtual compatibility mode [...] When you clone the disk, make a template out of it, or migrate it (if the migration involves copying the disk), the contents of the LUN are copied to a virtual disk (.vmdk) file.
2. Correct:

The above statements are either incomplete or incorrect. The described Storage vMotion behavior was a limitation when migrating RDMs in vSphere 4.x, yet in vSphere 5.x it has been improved.
Cormac Hogan - a senior technical marketing architect within the Cloud Infrastructure Product Marketing group at VMware - has further clarified RDM behavior during Storage vMotion operations.

  • VM with Physical (Pass-Thru) RDMs (Powered On – Storage vMotion):
    • If I try to change the format to thin or thick, then no Storage vMotion allowed.
    • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the pRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN.
  • VM with Virtual (non Pass-Thru) RDMs (Power On – Storage vMotion):
    • On a migrate, if I chose to covert the format in the advanced view, the vRDM is converted to a VMDK on the destination VMFS datastore.
    • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the vRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN (same behavior as pRDM).
  • VM with Physical (Pass-Thru) RDMs (Powered Off – Cold Migration):
    • On a migrate, if I chose to change the format (via the advanced view), the pRDM is converted to a VMDK on the destination VMFS datastore.
    • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the pRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN.
  • VM with Virtual (non Pass-Thru) RDMs (Power Off – Cold Migration):
    • On a migrate, if I chose to covert the format in the advanced view, the vRDM is converted to a VMDK on the destination VMFS datastore.
    • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the vRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN (same behaviour as pRDM).
2. Source:

VMware vSphere Blog.


Read more...

VSICM55 - Slide 06-77 - Virtual Machine Storage Policy Capabilities



Wrong:

In both the slide graphic and notes the definitions of Mirroring and Striping have been swapped:

When creating VM Storage Policies, note the two main techniques used to store objects: mirroring and striping.

Mirroring indicates the number of disk stripes that an object has. In a VMware Virtual SAN, mirroring reflects the number of HDDs across which a storage object is stored.

Striping indicates the number of failures that an object on a VMware Virtual SAN can tolerate. This number translates into the number of hosts, network, and/or disk failure a storage object can tolerate.
Correct:

The above sentences should be corrected as follows:

When creating VM Storage Policies, note the two main techniques used to store objects: mirroring and striping.

Mirroring indicates the number of failures that an object on a VMware Virtual SAN can tolerate. This number translates into the number of hosts, network, and/or disk failure a storage object can tolerate.

Striping indicates the number of disk stripes that an object has. In a VMware Virtual SAN, mirroring reflects the number of HDDs across which a storage object is stored.
Source:

VMware vSphere 5.5 Documentation Center.


Read more...
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